Frost Science@Home: Learning Resources & Activities

child making slime

Keep the learning going and the kids engaged! As part of our Frost Science@Home digital learning platform, this page will be your go-to resource link for DIY science, at-home science activities, step-by-step videos and more that you can try with your family at home.

The page will continue to stay updated with new information. You can also follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram where we’ll be posting regular updates and behind-the-scenes content. Please share it with your family and friends, and tag us at #FrostScienceAtHome!

 

Activity Videos & Resources

Make Plastic Out of Milk

Experiment with chemistry concepts as you engineer your very own plastic polymer from casein, a protein found in milk, using common kitchen ingredients.

  • Make Plastic Out of Milk Activity Toolkit. Click Here

 

April 2020 Stargazing

Use this guide to practice astronomy basics, including a special focus on constellations, while searching for the stars and planet visible in the sky above you.

  • April 2020 Stargazing Activity Toolkit. Click Here

 

Building Bubbles

Explore the phenomenon of surface tension by creating bubbles. Experiment with different combinations of materials to build your own bubble mix!

 

Scientific Sorting

Collect your favorite natural objects from your own backyard and sort them by their physical characteristics to learn about the important scientific process of taxonomy while practicing fine motor skills. This is a great activity for children five and under.

 

Sundial Science

Discover how the sun and its shadow is used to tell time by creating a sundial – an instrument that tracks the position of the sun to indicate time of day.

 

Friction Fun

Discover the force of friction by creating ramps made of different materials and then seeing which one allows your racecar to go the fastest.

 

Soap Putty

Get hands-on and a little messy as you investigate polymers, including what it is, what it is made of, and how we interact with them every day by creating your own soap putty.

 

Additional At-Home Resources

Water Cycle

Investigate the three main processes of the water cycle through a hands-on experiment highlighting how sunlight and water temperature play important roles in these processes.

Clouds in the Sky

Head outside and observe the sky to identify different types of clouds. Then create your own 3D model of your favorite cloud with common materials. This is a great activity for children five and under.

Phases of the Moon

Launch into a lunar exploration of the special relationship between the Earth and the Moon by tracking how the phases of our Moon change in the night sky over time.

Dino Fossils

Explore how dinosaur tracks can still be discovered by scientists today, despite dinosaurs going extinct millions of years ago, by making your very own imprint fossil. This is a great activity for children five and under.

River Fractals

Discover the beauty and simplicity of naturally occurring branching fractals by creating your own paper watershed model.

 

 

Additional Resources

  • Smithsonian – Distance Learning. Click Here
  • How Things Fly – Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum. Click Here
  • Game Center – Smithsonian Science Education Center. Click Here
  • Live Science – Educational activities for homebound kids. Click Here
  • Association of Science & Technology Centers (ASTC) – Educational resources. Click Here
  • Ology – A science website for kids from the American Museum of Natural History. Click Here
  • Curriculum Collections – American Museum of Natural History. Click Here
  • Courses & Specializations – American Museum of Natural History. Click Here

With the museum closed due to COVID-19, we are losing admission and event revenue that we so heavily rely on. Please consider making a tax-deductible donation to help offset the cost of animal care and virtual programming during this difficult time. All donations, however small, will have an immediate impact.

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For questions on different ways to support Frost Science, please contact advancement@frostscience.org