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This summer, it’s all about the eclipse.

Come out and watch one of the most spectacular astronomical events from the museum’s Science Plaza on Monday, August 21. Our expert astronomy team will be on hand to make sure you’re safely studying the sky with our solar telescopes. As a courtesy to those guests who are interested in viewing the eclipse, Frost Science will make available solar eclipse viewing glasses that have been identified by the American Astronomical Society (AAS) as appropriate for viewing the eclipse.*

We’ll also be live-streaming the NASA Eclipse Megacast, featuring scientists and members of the public across the country as they watch and study the eclipse. At 12:30 p.m., Enrique M. Suarez, Miami Postmaster for the United States Postal Service, will dedicate the first-of-its-kind Total Eclipse of the Sun Forever stamp which transforms the solar eclipse image into the Moon from the heat of a finger using thermochromic ink. A limited supply of the pane of 16 Forever stamps will be available at The Science Store at the museum for purchase.

Guests can also enjoy complimentary fresh, iced coffee, famous bite-sized Munchkins® and free swag courtesy of Dunkin’ Donuts in honor of this spectacular event.

A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between the Earth and the Sun, causing the Moon to temporarily cast its shadow on Earth. Solar eclipses happen about twice a year—although not all of them are total—and total eclipses are only visible to those located in the path of the Moon’s shadow as it crosses the Earth.

For the first time in 38 years, a total eclipse will be visible from the continental United States, and for the first time in 99 years it will cross from one coast to the other. While Miami falls just outside of the 100-mile path of totality, the city will still be able to witness a partial solar eclipse, with an impressive 80% of the sun’s surface shadowed by the Moon. The event will begin at 1:26 p.m. and end at 4:20 p.m., with max eclipse viewing occurring at 2:58 p.m.

After August 21, the next total eclipse will take place on July 2, 2019, and will only be visible from certain regions in Chile and Argentina. The next one over North America will visit Mexico, the United States, and Canada on April 8, 2024, while the next one to cross the United States will not happen until August 12, 2045, when Florida will actually be on the path of totality.

Don’t miss the must-see celestial event of the year!

This event is weather permitting.

****Complimentary glasses with museum admission only—while supplies last. Please carefully read User Instructions on solar eclipse glasses before use. Use of eclipse glasses is at your own risk. Glasses will be handed out starting at 9 a.m. when the museum opens, while supplies last. Ticket holders must be present to claim glasses.

Parking Instructions

  • Limited onsite parking. More at frostscience.org/parking.